Resources

ABR approves Façade Grant for St. Paul’s United Methodist Church

1.jpg$150,000 roof project awarded $10,000 grant

TIFFIN, OHIO – February 20, 2018 – Today, the Architectural Board of Review approved a Façade Enhancement Grant for a roofing project at St. Paul’s United Methodist Church. The project will include the removal and replacement of the sanctuary’s slate roof at an estimated cost of $150,000. The project was awarded a $10,000 grant.

Church representative Gary Arnold said the grant will help defray the cost of necessary repairs. “This is something that we have to take care of; it’s wonderful that this grant can cover a portion of the cost,” he said.

Tiffin Mayor Aaron Montz said the Façade Enhancement Grant program is a great tool for non-profit organizations. “I am pleased to see our local churches taking advantage of the grant,” he said. “There are a lot of costs associated with up-keeping such large buildings, and it is difficult on a non-profit budget.”

This grant brings the total investment related to the Façade Enhancement Grant Program for 2018 to $222,850 ($300,460 in total building investment), with a balance of $64,871 remaining in the city’s grant fund.

About the Façade Enhancement Program
This City of Tiffin reimbursement grant program was started in 2014 and provides a 50 percent match of funds for eligible exterior improvements on residential and commercial structures within the downtown historic district, up to $10,000. Each building is eligible to receive up to $10,000 per calendar year.  For more information, visit www.senecasuccess.com  (search “Façade Enhancement”).

About SIEDC
Started in 1983, the Seneca Industrial and Economic Development Corp. (SIEDC) is a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to driving positive economic, downtown, and community development in Tiffin and Seneca County, Ohio, which consistently ranks among the top communities nationally for economic development. Learn more about the great things going on in Tiffin and Seneca County at www.senecasuccess.com.

40+ institutions to meet your financing needs in Seneca County

One of the first steps in starting or expanding a business is securing financing, whether it be for operation costs, real estate, equipment investments or even planning your budget. Below are 40+ financial institutions in Seneca County to meet any needs you may have.

Institutions Supporting Economic Development

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Banks

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Financing Agencies

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Ohio BWC debuts new program

Ohio-BWC-LogoThe Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation has announced a new program designed to provide health and wellness resources and services to employees of small businesses (50 or fewer employees) in high-risk industries.

Better You, Better Ohio! aims to help both employers and their employees through this free, paperless program. Workers can earn financial rewards for participating in wellness assessments and screenings, and will be provided with opportunities to pursue a healthy lifestyle. This in turn benefits employers by encouraging a healthier workforce, increasing productivity and lowering workers’ compensation claims and insurance costs.

More details about the program and enrollment can be found here.

 

Tiffin earns Class 3 ISO fire ranking

fire logoAdding to the City of Tiffin’s excellence in safety services, the Tiffin Fire/Rescue Division has attained a new Public Protection Classification rating with the Insurance Services Office, ranking it among the top in the state and nation. Not only is this a mark of top-notch fire department, it can also translate to savings on on property taxes for Tiffin residents and businesses.

From the Tiffin Fire/Rescue Division:

The Tiffin Fire/ Rescue Division (TFRD) would like to announce the improvement of our Public Protection Classification rating. The TFRD recently went through a review with the Insurance Services Office (ISO) in order to review and update the fire division’s applicable classification rating. The TFRD is proud to announce we have been awarded an ISO Class rating of 3. The TFRD was previously an ISO Class 4.

The classification system is designed to provide an objective countrywide standard that helps fire departments budget and plan for equipment, training and facilities.  The Public Protection Classification system includes 10 classifications, an ISO Class 1 represents an exemplary fire suppression program, and Class 10 indicates that the area’s fire suppression program does not meet the ISO’s minimum criteria.

A community PPC rating is dependent upon:

  • Needed Fire Flows (the amount of water necessary for fire suppression)
  • Emergency Communications (dispatching)
  • Fire Department (equipment, staffing, training, geographic distribution of fire companies, operational considerations and community risk reduction)
  • Water Supply (inspection and flow-testing of hydrants, alternative water supply operations and careful evaluation of the amount of available water compared with the amount needed to suppress fires up to 3,500 gallons per minute)

With the award of the new classification it places the TFRD among the top 10% of the nation’s 44,672 fire departments and top 12% of the 2473 fire departments serving the State of Ohio.

The report is comprised of 3 sections:

1) Emergency communications account for 10% of the classification

2) Water supply system – 40% of the classification

3) Fire department – 50% of the total classification

The ISO’s Public Protection Classification program plays a central role in the insurance industry across the nation. Underwriters’ use PPC data for marketing, underwriting and as an aide to establish fair premiums to both personal as well as and commercial property insurance.

Kevin S. Veletean

Fire Chief

Council approves downtown sign program

Grant provides up to 50% reimbursement for sign costs

Renaissance Sign 2TIFFIN, OHIO – December 4, 2017 – Tiffin City Council approved a new Sign Enhancement Program in a meeting Monday night and set aside $10,000 to fund the program in 2018. The program is designed to assist business owners in downtown Tiffin in displaying effective and consistent signage.

Tiffin Mayor Aaron Montz said the program is a natural companion to the Façade Enhancement Program introduced in 2014. “Through the Façade Enhancement Program, downtown building and business owners have been able to make drastic changes to the look of their building. To date, the city has invested $350,000 in the program, resulting in $1.4 million in renovations,” he said. “With the sign program, we are able to take the transformation one step further.”

The grant is a 50 percent reimbursement of expenses directly related to perpendicular signage on properties within the downtown target area, up to a maximum match of $1,000.  This grant is available on a first come, first served basis from application approval.  Applications will be accepted starting Jan. 1, 2018. For the first 30 days, preference will be given to owners who have successfully completed Façade Enhancement Program projects.

Signage was laid out in the Downtown Strategic Plan adopted by Council in 2010. The plan called for consistent standards for downtown signage to improve community character along with the Façade Enhancement Program. Similar programs have been adopted by other Ohio Main Street communities, including the Gateway District in Cleveland, Cambridge Main Street, and Main Street Wooster, to great success. A study of one Gateway District business showed a 20 percent increase in foot traffic after a sign enhancement project.

For more information about the program, contact Downtown Manager Amy Reinhart at 419.619.5517 or reinhart@senecacounty.org.

About SIEDC
Started in 1983, the Seneca Industrial and Economic Development Corp. (SIEDC) is a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to driving positive economic, downtown, and community development in Tiffin and Seneca County, Ohio, which consistently ranks among the top communities nationally for economic development. Learn more about the great things going on in Tiffin and Seneca County at www.senecasuccess.com.

TERRA STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OHIO SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER RECOGNIZED WITH AWARD

Press release provide by Terra State Community College.

IMG_6040 (2)Fremont, OH, November 14, 2017 – The Ohio Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at Terra State Community College was presented the 2017 Ohio SBDC Customer Satisfaction Award at its annual statewide conference in Columbus held November 7 and 8.  It is the first time the Terra State SBDC has been recognized with the award.

The award is given to the one Ohio SBDC center with the highest rate of customer satisfaction based upon its training services, counseling knowledge and expertise, and advice given to customers, and the likelihood they would recommend the SBDC to friends or colleagues.  Bill Auxter, Terra State SBDC Director, says, “The Customer Satisfaction Award is the most coveted honor because it is recognition from the customers you serve”.

The Small Business Development Center is part of a national network of over 1,000 centers throughout the US and 30 centers serving Ohio.  For more information about the SBDCs, contact Bill Auxter at 419-559-2210 or bauxter@terra.edu.

Terra State Community College is a two-year accredited, state-supported, commuter college located in Fremont, Ohio. Terra State has a long history of service to the community and providing students with an education that is both accessible and affordable. Terra State offers twenty-two Applied Degrees and Certificates to students.

OSU Extension Office connects community with university resources

osu extensionThe Ohio State University Extension in Seneca County aims to connect the university’s resources and knowledge to the community. Originally working closely with farmers to share research on growing better crops and livestock, the OSU Extension now works with many different parts of the community. It separates these parts into four compact areas of outreach; Agriculture and Natural Resources, 4-H Youth Development, Family and Consumer Services, and Community Development.

Agriculture and Natural Resources programs assist with technology, marketing and educational support, and even offer training opportunities and certifications.  4-H Youth Development teaches kids lessons in leadership, communication and collaboration while increasing their knowledge in math, science, technology and a variety of other topics. Kids are able to participate in a number of ways, including community clubs, camps, in-school and after-school activities, and summer programs that both increase their self-confidence and personal skills in addition to honing their skills in specific subjects such as animals, computers, public speaking, or cooking. Family and Consumer Services provides community members with the skills, knowledge and resources to make informed, healthy life choices. This is done through teaching and promoting safe food practices, better nutrition, better finances and better relationships using evidence-based, impartial, current research into useful information that can improve the quality of people’s lives. Community Development advances income and employment opportunities by applying cutting-edge research, knowledge and innovations to improve local businesses and the communities they serve. By examining the needs of each community, the OSU Extension is able to enhance the wellbeing of communities and neighborhoods through interactive and collaborative partnerships with local businesses and organizations, community leaders and local officials.

Since 1914, the Ohio State University Extension has been helping Ohioans build better lives, better businesses, and better communities. To learn more about the OSU Extension visit their website, and check out some of the additional programs they offer like the Master Gardener Volunteers and SNAP-Ed, a free nutrition education and obesity prevention program serving low-income adults and youth.

Check out this video for an overview of the office: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuP5o__j4Hk

SBA programs support women business owners

SBAOctober is National Women’s Small Business Month, and the U.S. Small Business Administration is highlighting the programs they offer in support of women in business. Reports by the National Association of Women’s Business Owners state that women-owned businesses are the fastest growing sector of the economy, with 9.9 million in the United States currently employing over 8 million workers and contributing over 1.4 trillion dollars in sales to the U.S. economy. Impressive facts and figures aside, the SBA is still determined to encourage women entrepreneurs through its “three C’s”- Capital, Contracts, and Counseling.

Through capital, SBA’s lending partners provide loans to small businesses that may not qualify for loans elsewhere. Women tend to start with less capital than men because research shows women finance through personal savings and credit cards, while men often opt for loans. Businesses with more capital tend to have higher sales and employ more people, and the SBA offers a Lender Match Tool in addition to a small loan program to help women start their business in the best position possible.

SBA trains entrepreneurs how complete contacts with the federal government. The Federal government is the largest purchaser of goods and services, and SBA’s goal is that 5 percent of contacts are with women-owned small businesses. Events targeting both the federal and private procurement matches the two.

Maybe the most useful tool, the counseling through SBA has helped women increase their self-sufficiency and their confidence, with 47% receiving training that assisted them to open their business. The SBA has 68 district offices and resource partners in communities across the country, among them the Women’s Business Centers. DreamBuilder introduces participants to all areas of business ownership through a carefully crafted and engaging curriculum, featured in English and Spanish. At the conclusion of the program, women leave with a business plan to start their own business or develop an existing one.

Learn about these and other women-owned business programs and resources here.

Seneca Conservation District

seneca conservation district logoFor more than 60 years, the Seneca Conservation District has been working with landowners, local, state, and federal agencies as an advocate of conservation in order to maintain healthy and productive working landscapes. With 24 staff members, 4 of which have joined the team in the last year, the District’s long history of helping people is continued through educating the community on how to take care of the environment. Many members of the staff specialize in an area of conservation, and they are ready to assist the community by providing resources and guidance to residents and business owners.

The Seneca Conservation District helps farmers with nutrient management, improving soil health, responsible water quality and quantity, protecting local wildlife habitats, and managing manure nutrients. The District has cover crop resources for farmers, as well as no-till drills, tree planters, and soil probes to rent, and field flags, erosion control netting and staples for purchase. In addition, the District arranges pasture and grazing management plans, engineering plans, private sprayings on rural ditches, new research and investigation into conservation techniques, and wildlife crop damage complaint consultations. Also overseeing the Seneca County Ditch Maintenance Program and the Seneca County Floodplain Management program, staff is ready to help farmers balance decisions by considering economic impact.

Schools can incorporate conservation into their curriculum with ease as the Seneca Conservation District provides educators with classroom instruction, presentations, and education materials on natural resources and agricultural topics. Students can also benefit from the educational tours given at the outdoor learning lab, Miller Conservation Farm. The District can assist educators on grant applications for related projects and with “Wild School” sites and fundraising, and supports students through Conservation Camps scholarships, academic scholarships, mentoring/job shadowing experiences, and youth conservation trophies at the Seneca County Fair. Students can also explore the Miller Conservation Farm, Kelbley Wildlife Area, and Red Fox Wildlife area which are maintained by the Seneca Conservation District. All these environmental programs are top of the line educational materials that strive to teach our youth about the importance and value of soil and water resources.

The community is encouraged to take part events hosted throughout the year by the Seneca County District. Farmers, college, and high school students join the team as part of the Nutrient Bus Tour, a fantastic learning experience to gather information about nutrients flowing into the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB) and how they affect Lake Erie algal blooms last November. Farmers were invited on a cruise in August with The Charter Boat Captains Association to chat with the Division of Wildlife to learn about the unique habitat and species that live in and on the shores and water of Lake Erie. For families, Water Fest is a day filled with games and activities held at the Miller Conservation Farm, including crafts, hands-on water activities, and hayrides. Miller Conservation Farm hosts many events including youth clay pigeon shoots, a mobility impaired deer hunt, a youth turkey hunt, and many more!

Learn more about the Seneca Conservation District here.

Terra State Community College Offers Tuition Free Option

New Workforce Demand Scholarship Available for 2018 Graduates
Press release provided by Terra State Community College

TSCC Workforce Demand Scholarship

Terra State Community College President Dr. Jerome Webster announces new Workforce Demand Scholarship.

October 2, 2017 (Fremont, OH) – According to the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, 64 percent of Ohio jobs in 2020 will require postsecondary degrees or credentials.  However, approximately 45% of Ohio high school graduates do not attend college directly after high school.  That is why it is imperative that this year’s high school seniors give serious thought about continuing their education beyond high school.  To assist those in their decision, Terra State Community College is offering 2018 graduates the opportunity to attend class tuition-free if they are pursuing a career in a high-demand job field through the Workforce Demand Scholarship program.  In addition to an education, students will also gain a guaranteed work-based experience.

Terra State will provide up to an Associate’s Degree tuition-free to 2018 high school graduates.  The Workforce Demand Scholarship is available to students majoring in these academic programs:

  • Computer Systems
  • Digital Media Technology
  • Electrical
  • Health Information Technology
  • Management (Business, Agribusiness and Hospitality)
  • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Music Technology
  • Office Administration
  • Robotics-Integrated Manufacturing Technology
  • Welding

“The majority of jobs need or will need a post-high school education,” says Heath Martin, Terra State’s Assistant Vice President for Student and Enrollment Services.  “The Workforce Demand Scholarship is a vehicle that will allow 2018 high school graduates to take advantage of getting an Associate’s Degree tuition-free.”

The Workforce Demand Scholarship will pay the gap between the cost of tuition and general fees and state and federal grants received by the student.  “For example,” Martin says, “At Terra State, the total cost of tuition and general fees for the fall and spring semesters is $4926.  If a student receives a Pell grant in the amount of $2000, your scholarship is the difference in the amount and would be $2296.  However, books and other fees are not covered by the scholarship.”

To qualify, a student must be enrolled full-time (twelve or more credit hours) for the fall and spring semesters and part-time (six or more credit hours) for the summer semester.  Students who are awarded the Workforce Demand Scholarship will be provided the opportunity to participate in a work-based experience with an employer in Terra State’s service area.

To apply for the scholarship, applicants must:

“A recipient of the Workforce Demand Scholarship will need to enroll full-time at Terra State and attend consecutive fall and spring terms,” Martin points out.  “Students will have to maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and have a course completion rate of 68%.  Students also have the option of enrolling in summer school.”  Recipients will lose all benefits if they stop taking classes and resume at a later date.

Terra State Community College continues its dynamic transformation as it works toward the goal of becoming the best rural community college in the nation.  Offering the Workforce Demand Scholarship is an additional avenue to support the college’s goals.  For more information on the Workforce Demand Scholarship, interested persons can call 419.559.2349 or email admissions@terra.edu.

Terra State Community College is a two-year accredited, state-supported, commuter college located in Fremont, Ohio. Terra State has a long history of service to the community and providing students with an education that is both accessible and affordable. Terra State offers twenty-two Applied Degrees and Certificates to students.