Resources

TERRA STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OHIO SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER RECOGNIZED WITH AWARD

Press release provide by Terra State Community College.

IMG_6040 (2)Fremont, OH, November 14, 2017 – The Ohio Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at Terra State Community College was presented the 2017 Ohio SBDC Customer Satisfaction Award at its annual statewide conference in Columbus held November 7 and 8.  It is the first time the Terra State SBDC has been recognized with the award.

The award is given to the one Ohio SBDC center with the highest rate of customer satisfaction based upon its training services, counseling knowledge and expertise, and advice given to customers, and the likelihood they would recommend the SBDC to friends or colleagues.  Bill Auxter, Terra State SBDC Director, says, “The Customer Satisfaction Award is the most coveted honor because it is recognition from the customers you serve”.

The Small Business Development Center is part of a national network of over 1,000 centers throughout the US and 30 centers serving Ohio.  For more information about the SBDCs, contact Bill Auxter at 419-559-2210 or bauxter@terra.edu.

Terra State Community College is a two-year accredited, state-supported, commuter college located in Fremont, Ohio. Terra State has a long history of service to the community and providing students with an education that is both accessible and affordable. Terra State offers twenty-two Applied Degrees and Certificates to students.

OSU Extension Office connects community with university resources

osu extensionThe Ohio State University Extension in Seneca County aims to connect the university’s resources and knowledge to the community. Originally working closely with farmers to share research on growing better crops and livestock, the OSU Extension now works with many different parts of the community. It separates these parts into four compact areas of outreach; Agriculture and Natural Resources, 4-H Youth Development, Family and Consumer Services, and Community Development.

Agriculture and Natural Resources programs assist with technology, marketing and educational support, and even offer training opportunities and certifications.  4-H Youth Development teaches kids lessons in leadership, communication and collaboration while increasing their knowledge in math, science, technology and a variety of other topics. Kids are able to participate in a number of ways, including community clubs, camps, in-school and after-school activities, and summer programs that both increase their self-confidence and personal skills in addition to honing their skills in specific subjects such as animals, computers, public speaking, or cooking. Family and Consumer Services provides community members with the skills, knowledge and resources to make informed, healthy life choices. This is done through teaching and promoting safe food practices, better nutrition, better finances and better relationships using evidence-based, impartial, current research into useful information that can improve the quality of people’s lives. Community Development advances income and employment opportunities by applying cutting-edge research, knowledge and innovations to improve local businesses and the communities they serve. By examining the needs of each community, the OSU Extension is able to enhance the wellbeing of communities and neighborhoods through interactive and collaborative partnerships with local businesses and organizations, community leaders and local officials.

Since 1914, the Ohio State University Extension has been helping Ohioans build better lives, better businesses, and better communities. To learn more about the OSU Extension visit their website, and check out some of the additional programs they offer like the Master Gardener Volunteers and SNAP-Ed, a free nutrition education and obesity prevention program serving low-income adults and youth.

Check out this video for an overview of the office: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuP5o__j4Hk

SBA programs support women business owners

SBAOctober is National Women’s Small Business Month, and the U.S. Small Business Administration is highlighting the programs they offer in support of women in business. Reports by the National Association of Women’s Business Owners state that women-owned businesses are the fastest growing sector of the economy, with 9.9 million in the United States currently employing over 8 million workers and contributing over 1.4 trillion dollars in sales to the U.S. economy. Impressive facts and figures aside, the SBA is still determined to encourage women entrepreneurs through its “three C’s”- Capital, Contracts, and Counseling.

Through capital, SBA’s lending partners provide loans to small businesses that may not qualify for loans elsewhere. Women tend to start with less capital than men because research shows women finance through personal savings and credit cards, while men often opt for loans. Businesses with more capital tend to have higher sales and employ more people, and the SBA offers a Lender Match Tool in addition to a small loan program to help women start their business in the best position possible.

SBA trains entrepreneurs how complete contacts with the federal government. The Federal government is the largest purchaser of goods and services, and SBA’s goal is that 5 percent of contacts are with women-owned small businesses. Events targeting both the federal and private procurement matches the two.

Maybe the most useful tool, the counseling through SBA has helped women increase their self-sufficiency and their confidence, with 47% receiving training that assisted them to open their business. The SBA has 68 district offices and resource partners in communities across the country, among them the Women’s Business Centers. DreamBuilder introduces participants to all areas of business ownership through a carefully crafted and engaging curriculum, featured in English and Spanish. At the conclusion of the program, women leave with a business plan to start their own business or develop an existing one.

Learn about these and other women-owned business programs and resources here.

Seneca Conservation District

seneca conservation district logoFor more than 60 years, the Seneca Conservation District has been working with landowners, local, state, and federal agencies as an advocate of conservation in order to maintain healthy and productive working landscapes. With 24 staff members, 4 of which have joined the team in the last year, the District’s long history of helping people is continued through educating the community on how to take care of the environment. Many members of the staff specialize in an area of conservation, and they are ready to assist the community by providing resources and guidance to residents and business owners.

The Seneca Conservation District helps farmers with nutrient management, improving soil health, responsible water quality and quantity, protecting local wildlife habitats, and managing manure nutrients. The District has cover crop resources for farmers, as well as no-till drills, tree planters, and soil probes to rent, and field flags, erosion control netting and staples for purchase. In addition, the District arranges pasture and grazing management plans, engineering plans, private sprayings on rural ditches, new research and investigation into conservation techniques, and wildlife crop damage complaint consultations. Also overseeing the Seneca County Ditch Maintenance Program and the Seneca County Floodplain Management program, staff is ready to help farmers balance decisions by considering economic impact.

Schools can incorporate conservation into their curriculum with ease as the Seneca Conservation District provides educators with classroom instruction, presentations, and education materials on natural resources and agricultural topics. Students can also benefit from the educational tours given at the outdoor learning lab, Miller Conservation Farm. The District can assist educators on grant applications for related projects and with “Wild School” sites and fundraising, and supports students through Conservation Camps scholarships, academic scholarships, mentoring/job shadowing experiences, and youth conservation trophies at the Seneca County Fair. Students can also explore the Miller Conservation Farm, Kelbley Wildlife Area, and Red Fox Wildlife area which are maintained by the Seneca Conservation District. All these environmental programs are top of the line educational materials that strive to teach our youth about the importance and value of soil and water resources.

The community is encouraged to take part events hosted throughout the year by the Seneca County District. Farmers, college, and high school students join the team as part of the Nutrient Bus Tour, a fantastic learning experience to gather information about nutrients flowing into the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB) and how they affect Lake Erie algal blooms last November. Farmers were invited on a cruise in August with The Charter Boat Captains Association to chat with the Division of Wildlife to learn about the unique habitat and species that live in and on the shores and water of Lake Erie. For families, Water Fest is a day filled with games and activities held at the Miller Conservation Farm, including crafts, hands-on water activities, and hayrides. Miller Conservation Farm hosts many events including youth clay pigeon shoots, a mobility impaired deer hunt, a youth turkey hunt, and many more!

Learn more about the Seneca Conservation District here.

Terra State Community College Offers Tuition Free Option

New Workforce Demand Scholarship Available for 2018 Graduates
Press release provided by Terra State Community College

TSCC Workforce Demand Scholarship

Terra State Community College President Dr. Jerome Webster announces new Workforce Demand Scholarship.

October 2, 2017 (Fremont, OH) – According to the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, 64 percent of Ohio jobs in 2020 will require postsecondary degrees or credentials.  However, approximately 45% of Ohio high school graduates do not attend college directly after high school.  That is why it is imperative that this year’s high school seniors give serious thought about continuing their education beyond high school.  To assist those in their decision, Terra State Community College is offering 2018 graduates the opportunity to attend class tuition-free if they are pursuing a career in a high-demand job field through the Workforce Demand Scholarship program.  In addition to an education, students will also gain a guaranteed work-based experience.

Terra State will provide up to an Associate’s Degree tuition-free to 2018 high school graduates.  The Workforce Demand Scholarship is available to students majoring in these academic programs:

  • Computer Systems
  • Digital Media Technology
  • Electrical
  • Health Information Technology
  • Management (Business, Agribusiness and Hospitality)
  • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Music Technology
  • Office Administration
  • Robotics-Integrated Manufacturing Technology
  • Welding

“The majority of jobs need or will need a post-high school education,” says Heath Martin, Terra State’s Assistant Vice President for Student and Enrollment Services.  “The Workforce Demand Scholarship is a vehicle that will allow 2018 high school graduates to take advantage of getting an Associate’s Degree tuition-free.”

The Workforce Demand Scholarship will pay the gap between the cost of tuition and general fees and state and federal grants received by the student.  “For example,” Martin says, “At Terra State, the total cost of tuition and general fees for the fall and spring semesters is $4926.  If a student receives a Pell grant in the amount of $2000, your scholarship is the difference in the amount and would be $2296.  However, books and other fees are not covered by the scholarship.”

To qualify, a student must be enrolled full-time (twelve or more credit hours) for the fall and spring semesters and part-time (six or more credit hours) for the summer semester.  Students who are awarded the Workforce Demand Scholarship will be provided the opportunity to participate in a work-based experience with an employer in Terra State’s service area.

To apply for the scholarship, applicants must:

“A recipient of the Workforce Demand Scholarship will need to enroll full-time at Terra State and attend consecutive fall and spring terms,” Martin points out.  “Students will have to maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and have a course completion rate of 68%.  Students also have the option of enrolling in summer school.”  Recipients will lose all benefits if they stop taking classes and resume at a later date.

Terra State Community College continues its dynamic transformation as it works toward the goal of becoming the best rural community college in the nation.  Offering the Workforce Demand Scholarship is an additional avenue to support the college’s goals.  For more information on the Workforce Demand Scholarship, interested persons can call 419.559.2349 or email admissions@terra.edu.

Terra State Community College is a two-year accredited, state-supported, commuter college located in Fremont, Ohio. Terra State has a long history of service to the community and providing students with an education that is both accessible and affordable. Terra State offers twenty-two Applied Degrees and Certificates to students.

 

Community seeks proposals for new Comprehensive Plan

Seneca County, Tiffin, Fostoria to collaborate on community plan

View the complete request for proposal here.

TIFFIN, OHIO – September 27, 2017 – The Seneca Regional Planning Commission released a request for proposals for a new county-wide Comprehensive Plan, to include Tiffin and Fostoria. The request includes a combined plan for the three entities, as well as individual plans, each with separate cost estimates, and a twenty-year horizon. Proposals will be accepted until Wednesday, October 25, 2017 at 3 p.m.

Seneca County Commission President Mike Kerschner said the plan is yet another way for the county to partner with the cities on a common cause. “This plan will continue the climate of collaboration between the different entities within Seneca County, including the successful merger of the Fostoria and Tiffin courts, as well as the execution of the Justice Center,” he said.

The Comprehensive Plan will address long-range policy for land use planning, transportation, economic development, housing, public facilities, historic, natural and cultural resources, agricultural preservation, intergovernmental cooperation, budget preparation, and capital improvement planning and other facets of community life deemed important by the chosen consultant and agreed to by the participating entities.

Tiffin Mayor Aaron Montz is looking forward to a new plan and direction for the city. “Our current plan was created in 1994 and is, at this point, extremely outdated. I am excited to see what the consultants will come up with for the community’s development,” he said.

Work is anticipated to begin in 2018 with an 18- to 24-month timeframe, if a firm is selected and funding allocated. The finished product should be ready for adoption by the participating legislative bodies at public hearings by late 2019.

Inquiries should be directed to Charlene Watkins, Executive Director, Seneca Regional Planning Commission, cjwatkins@senecarpc.org, 419.443.7936 ext. 123.

About SIEDC
Started in 1983, the Seneca Industrial and Economic Development Corp. (SIEDC) is a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to driving positive economic, downtown, and community development in Tiffin and Seneca County, Ohio, which consistently ranks among the top communities nationally for economic development. Learn more about the great things going on in Tiffin and Seneca County at www.senecasuccess.com.

$1.6M invested in short line rail 2016-2017

 

20170918_155958Major maintenance project slated for Northern and Ohio Western Railroad

The Sandusky County – Seneca County – City of Tiffin Port Authority (SSTPA), in conjunction with Omnitrax, has slated an approximately $900,000 railroad maintenance project for the Northern and Ohio Western Railroad (NOW) this fall. This project brings the total investment in rail and crossings for the short line railroad to more than $1.6 million over the past two years.

SSTPA Board Chairman Jim Supance stressed the importance of the rail and its maintenance: “The short line railroad is a valuable asset to business in Seneca and Sandusky Counties. We are committed to continuing to invest in the rail and appreciate the partnership with Omnitrax on day-to-day operations and projects like these.”

The NOW is a short line railroad that spans 26 miles, from Tiffin to Woodville. It was purchased by the SSTPA in 1990 and is operated by Omnitrax, one of the largest short line railroad operators in North America. The NOW serves 8 shippers and carries more than 2,600 carloads each year.

This fall, Omnitrax will replace 7,000 railroad ties, and resurface 24 miles of track at a cost of approximately $900,000. This is the second large investment for the year; new gates and lights were installed at two crossings and a road crossing was rehabbed, all in Gibsonburg, at a cost of $500,000 to the State of Ohio. The two projects, combined with brush cutting, signal updates and two road crossing rehabs, bring the total investment for 2017 to over $1.5 million. In 2016, six rail crossings were rehabbed for $100,000.

 

DC Weld Tech to offer welding basics

Welding it togetherLocal welder Dave Clark is hoping to make a difference in his community with a training program for out-of-practice or aspiring welders. The aim of DC Weld Tech is to enrich the community by offering a cost-effective training program in the field of welding in a one on one setting.

From Dave:

“We feel this important to the community to offer a skilled trades training which will open to doors to those individuals looking to better themselves by obtaining a better job or if they choose to further their education in the field.

“We have been a family owned and operated welding and fabricating company for over 20 years. Now we would like to share what we have learned over those years with our community with our new company DC Weld Tech. This new venture will allow us to to give back to our neighbors by offering a skilled trades training program in the field of welding. This course will be cost effective in a one on one setting. These individuals will be able to obtain a job in the field, the knowledge to take a certification test, or to further their education at a higher level. Our hope is to be able to offer this course to anyone with a willingness to learn who may not be able to afford college and would benefit from a one on one setting.”

For more information, visit www.dcweldtech.com.

Businesses, farmers, entrepreneurs invited to explore Chinese consumer opportunities at Gateway ’17

AlibabaThe Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce would like to send a delegation to this event. If you are interested in attending call the SIEDC office at 419.447.3831. From Alibaba’s press release:

Alibaba Group is hosting Gateway ’17, an inaugural conference to help U.S. businesses, farmers and entrepreneurs explore growth opportunities and reach millions of Chinese consumers. Gateway ’17 will take place at the Cobo Center in Detroit, Michigan on June 20-21, 2017.

Gateway ’17 is expected to attract more than 1,000 businesses across the U.S. The event will include keynote speeches from leading entrepreneurs, including Jack Ma, founder and executive chairman of Alibaba Group, as well as category breakout sessions, business solutions sessions and marketplace networking opportunities.

With incomes rising in China, the Chinese middle class continues to grow as does consumer demand for access to high-quality products from the United States. Alibaba helps U.S. businesses by connecting them to Chinese consumers and empowering them to grow their businesses by accessing the China opportunity.

“China is an important and viable market for a wide range of products and services. This event will open doors for Michigan businesses, farmers and entrepreneurs by helping them identify and enter into new relationships there,” said Rick Snyder, Governor of Michigan. “By participating in Gateway ’17, Michigan businesses will have a unique opportunity to reach new customers in the fastest-growing economy in the world, and we encourage all companies looking to expand into exporting to attend this event.”

“A company with the reach and influence of Alibaba could have chosen any city to host its first conference and we are thrilled they picked Detroit,” said Mike Duggan, Mayor of Detroit. “This represents a great opportunity for Detroit’s small business owners and entrepreneurs to have access to Alibaba’s global network.”

About Alibaba Group
Alibaba Group’s mission is to make it easy to do business anywhere. The company aims to build the future infrastructure of commerce. It envisions that its customers will meet, work and live at Alibaba, and that it will be a company that lasts at least 102 years.

Additional Information:

Obtaining a liquor permit

Department of Commerce SealThinking about starting a business that involves liquor sales, or adding liquor sales to an existing business? Here are some of the basics of filing for a liquor permit in Ohio.

The Ohio Department of Commerce Liquor Control Division is the state agency responsible for liquor licensing.  They issue new licenses and annual renewals, as well as transfers, for the 25,000 private Ohio businesses that are alcohol manufacturers, distributors, suppliers, retailers, and organizers of special events where alcohol is sold.

There are several different types of liquor permits depending on use, and a limited number of each type of liquor permit is available to each county/city based on population. A complete list and explanation of what is covered under each specific permit can be found here. You can check the availability of the permit you would like to request here, and search the database of permit holders here.

Once you have determined which permit you will need and its availability, you can fill out an application. There are two applications: new bar, restaurant or carryout (application here) and all other types of permits (application here). The Division provides a complete guide to the application process here.

Special permits available in downtown Tiffin:

In 2013, the City of Tiffin established a Community Revitalization District with the Division of Liquor Control, which created 15 liquor permits available within the downtown Tiffin district. These D-5L permits are restricted to the approved district and carry several requirements, the most notable of which is that the establishment be a retail food or food service business, serving beverages by the glass for consumption on premises, and whose food/meal receipts total at least 75% of sales. The addresses included in the district can be found here, and the requirements, as stated by the Ohio Revised Code, here.