Omnitrax

Northern Ohio & Western Railway receives CSX award for Dramatic Growth in 2017

OmniTRAXThe Northern Ohio & Western Railway, the short line rail operated by OmniTRAX on behalf of the Sandusky County-Seneca County-City of Tiffin Port Authority, received the 2017 CSX Short Line Development Award for a more than 150% growth in shipping volume.

Press release from OmniTRAX:

DENVER – OmniTRAX, Inc., one of the largest privately held transportation service companies in North America and an affiliate of The Broe Group, received the 2017 CSX Short Line Development Award for the Northern Ohio & Western Railway, LLC (NOW) at the 2018 CSX Short Line Workshop in St Augustine, FL this week. The award, which recognizes the “Cooperative efforts that generated the highest switch carrier carload percentage growth,” was received by Doug Ernstes, Vice President of Business Development at OmniTRAX.

The CSX Short Line Development Award is one of several awards given annually by the Class I railroad to its short line partners. NOW earned the honor for a switching volume increase of more than 150% in 2017, which resulted from additional covered hoppers of lime shipped from Carmeuse Lime.

“The OmniTRAX team is very pleased to earn this award from CSX. In the railroad business, it’s not easy to double your business in 10 years let alone one, so we’re very proud of the hard work and collaboration of Tim Schumm, and the entire NOW Team that made it happen,” said Kevin Shuba, CEO of OmniTRAX.

In addition to Ernstes, OmniTRAX was represented at the event by Peter Tousenard, Chief Commercial Officer; David Rohal, Senior Vice President of Customer & Class I Relations; Gord Anutooshkin, Senior Vice President of Operations; Wally Sieruga, Vice President of Operations; Steve Ward, Vice President of Engineering; Allan Thiem, Vice President of Class I Relations; Matt Despos, Vice President of Operations, and Jeff Burns, Commercial and Marketing Support Manager.

About the Northern Ohio & Western Railway, LLC
The NOW operates more than 25 miles of track southeast of Toledo, extending from Woodville to Tiffin, Ohio. The communities served by NOW are within the I-75 corridor and a growing industrial base and a plentiful supply of developable land. NOW serves customers like Ameriwood Industries, Carmeuse Lime, Kokosing, Laminate Technologies, MGQ Asphalt Terminal and National Machinery, and the primary commodities transported are limestone, lime and pressed board.

$1.6M invested in short line rail 2016-2017

 

20170918_155958Major maintenance project slated for Northern and Ohio Western Railroad

The Sandusky County – Seneca County – City of Tiffin Port Authority (SSTPA), in conjunction with Omnitrax, has slated an approximately $900,000 railroad maintenance project for the Northern and Ohio Western Railroad (NOW) this fall. This project brings the total investment in rail and crossings for the short line railroad to more than $1.6 million over the past two years.

SSTPA Board Chairman Jim Supance stressed the importance of the rail and its maintenance: “The short line railroad is a valuable asset to business in Seneca and Sandusky Counties. We are committed to continuing to invest in the rail and appreciate the partnership with Omnitrax on day-to-day operations and projects like these.”

The NOW is a short line railroad that spans 26 miles, from Tiffin to Woodville. It was purchased by the SSTPA in 1990 and is operated by Omnitrax, one of the largest short line railroad operators in North America. The NOW serves 8 shippers and carries more than 2,600 carloads each year.

This fall, Omnitrax will replace 7,000 railroad ties, and resurface 24 miles of track at a cost of approximately $900,000. This is the second large investment for the year; new gates and lights were installed at two crossings and a road crossing was rehabbed, all in Gibsonburg, at a cost of $500,000 to the State of Ohio. The two projects, combined with brush cutting, signal updates and two road crossing rehabs, bring the total investment for 2017 to over $1.5 million. In 2016, six rail crossings were rehabbed for $100,000.